6 infographic best practices for creating jaw dropping infographics - header wide

Written by:
Chloe West

6 Infographic Best Practices for Creating Jaw-Dropping Infographics

6 infographic best practices for creating jaw dropping infographics - header wide

An infographic can be an extremely powerful way to display information for your audience, but only if it’s done correctly. So many companies are working to create infographics, but they keep missing the mark.

When it comes to creating an infographic that is both educational and visually appealing, there are a few infographic best practices that business owners and marketers should always keep in mind.

These best practices exist to help designers and non-designers alike follow a sort of blueprint while creating their infographics.

This article will help you understand the six infographic best practices your business needs to start pumping out compelling visuals that tell your story, convey information and drive traffic to your website.

Traffic that, in turn, will likely turn into paying customers!

Ready to take advantage of your next infographic? Make sure you stick to these proven best practices in each and every infographic design:

 

1 Infographic Best Practice: Stick to One Main Point

An infographic isn’t the place to do a deep dive into a topic.

There are other times and places for in-depth content, like a longform blog article, an ebook, or an online course. An infographic is simply meant to visually illustrate a set of data or supporting arguments for one main point.

For example, look at this infographic on ways to increase blog engagement:

infographic best practice - stick to one main point infographic example template visme 1

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

This Visme infographic is designed to be simple and focus on a single main point: how to increase blog engagement.

Each supporting element in this infographic details a step involved in doing so. This is exactly how you want to set up your infographic. Make it as easy as possible to see and understand your point right off the bat.

Each time you’re getting started on a new infographic for your company, you need to decide on your topic, and don’t delve into different interpretations, side arguments or tangents of your main point.

How do you pick your infographic topic or main point?

Choosing your infographic topic can seem tricky. You’re invested in your industry. There are so many topics to choose from.

But which of those topics are only interesting to you because you’re passionate about your business? And which topics would actually be of interest and offer value to your target audience?

You should always stick to infographic topics that are interesting to your audience. This is how you draw potential leads and customers in, engage them with your content and get them to click over to your website.

Here's an example of an infographic topic that's a good fit for companies that offer digital or video marketing services:

infographic best practice - stick to one main point infographic example template visme 2

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

It’s very obvious what this infographic’s viewpoint is: you should be taking advantage of video marketing. The infographic explains exactly why, and it includes statistics to support its main point.

The entire infographic covers information that is all going back to the single main topic, keeping it succinct and cohesive. At the same time, it's working to convince and convert the audience into paying customers.

When you start paying attention to your audience and keeping them in mind, it becomes much easier to determine your infographic topic.

What is going to get them more interested in your business or industry? What would entice them to buy?

Brainstorm a list of topics and make sure each one has a specific audience that it caters to. This ensures your infographic will reach the right people, and drive leads and traffic to your website.

 

2 Infographic Best Practice: Let Your Visuals Do the Talking

This is one of the most important infographic best practices in this entire list. After all, what is an infographic without visuals? Basically only text. And if there’s one thing your infographic shouldn’t be, it’s all text.

The term infographic is literally “informational graphic” put together, so by definition, it needs to include graphic elements alongside all the text, data points and supporting arguments.

Also, you need to make sure your infographic still makes sense even after taking most of the text out. In a design like this, your text should be mostly supplementary. Check out the example below to see what we mean:

infographic best practice - visuals text graphic infographic example template visme 1

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

You can see how graphic elements are being used to represent the text and the data. The text helps us to fully understand what the data is showing, but we can still get the gist of the information without it.

You also want the image/visual to be memorable. There are a few ways to do this. One way is to see if you can relate the visuals to your topic.

Incorporating actual imagery from real life to illustrate your point is a great way to help your audience remember your infographic.

Take a look at this infographic example, which uses an actual design of a tree to explain how much nature does for the economy:

infographic best practice - visuals text graphic infographic example template visme 2

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!

  • Add your own text, icons, logo and more
  • Add interactive buttons and animations
  • Use drag-and-drop content blocks
  • Customize colors and fonts to fit your brand

Edit and Download Now

It’s important to also note that consistency is key. Don't use different types of design elements at the top of your infographic than you do at the bottom.

For example, if you start using line icons in your infographic design, make sure that you use line icons throughout the entire visual.

While your infographic needs to be visually appealing, it also needs to perfectly illustrate your point. The best way to do that is by using the right visuals with just the right amount of supporting text and data elements.

What types of visuals should your infographic include?

When creating an infographic, especially when using an infographic design tool like Visme, you have a lot of options for graphic elements:

  • You can add different types of text: a subheader, a snippet of body copy, a quote, a call to action, and more.
  • There are statistics and figures, including different ways of representing percentages and one-off pieces of data.
  • You’ve got your basic graphic elements, like icons, text bubbles, diagrams, shapes and more.
  • You could even decide to add in some photography if your infographic is right for that type of visual effect.
  • And you’ve got your data visualizations.

Your infographic should include some combination of these five elements.

It doesn’t need to include all five every time, but these text and design elements need to be spread out throughout.

What is data visualization?

Data visualization is the representation of information in a visual format, such as a chart, diagram, graph, picture, icon and so on.

In the infographic example below, the data visualization is a line graph that shows the reaction of dogs vs. cats when it comes to missing their humans.

infographic best practice - visuals data visualization infographic example template visme 1

Infographic created in Visme

Choose your data visualization wisely while creating your infographic. What makes the most sense for displaying your data or message?

You can test out different types of data visualization techniques in Visme's editor, like charts, tables, widgets, maps and more.

What data visualization type should you use?

There are over 44 different types of data visualization, as showcased in this blog post. From column bar graphs and Venn diagrams to flow charts and more, there are tons of different ways to illustrate your information.

The type of data visualization you choose really depends on the type of data you have. There are radial elements that help represent percentages, as seen in the second section of the infographic example below:

infographic best practice - visuals data visualization infographic example template visme 2

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

Here are some helpful tips to remember:

  • Venn diagrams compare information, while circle charts and stacked graphs can compare numbers.
  • Flowcharts are an ideal way to showcase hierarchies or other chronological data and information.
  • Line graphs and scatter graphs do a great job at sharing data of something that happened over time.

Determining your data visualization type relies on you first actually obtaining the data and information you want to share. That way, you can center your illustrations around it.

 

3 Infographic Best Practice: Make Your Flow Make Sense

When your audience sees your infographic for the first time, where does their eye go automatically? Are they following the infographic in the correct order or is your information all over the place?

You need to make sure the flow of your infographic makes sense, and that people know which order to read your data and supporting arguments in.

There are two ways to do this: first, you can simply place your elements in the correct order, or second, you can use an actual line, arrow, or other visual indicator to physically direct the reader where to go.

infographic best practice - flow numbered list listicle infographic example template visme

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

The infographic above numbers each section, but it’s also laid out in a way that’s obvious where your eye should go next.

Notice how there are clear separations between each section that utilize different colors to let readers know that one supporting argument is done and they can move onto the next point.

By contrast, the infographic below is much less organized at first glance.

However, arrows are used to lead the reader from one section to the next so that no one is left confused and overwhelmed, trying to understand all of the information put in front of them.

infographic best practice - flow creative flowchart process arrows infographic example template visme

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!

  • Add your own text, icons, logo and more
  • Add interactive buttons and animations
  • Use drag-and-drop content blocks
  • Customize colors and fonts to fit your brand

Edit and Download Now

4 Infographic Best Practice: Choose 2-3 Complementary Fonts

Choosing the perfect font can be extremely difficult. There are just so many options to choose from!

Before you start pinpointing two (or three, if you need an accent font) complementary fonts for your infographic, you need to first understand what type of fonts you need to stay away from.

Unless you’re using them in large type for a header, you need to stay far away from decorative or script fonts when it comes to infographic design.

Many infographic text elements are smaller in size, as there’s a larger emphasis placed on visual elements, and these cursive or complicated font types can be tough to read at first glance.

How do you choose the right fonts for your infographic?

Well, a good rule of thumb to start with is a combination of serif/serif, sans serif/sans serif, or serif/sans serif. But here are a few more tips to help with your font pairing.

Don’t pair two fonts from the same classification.

There are four different types of fonts:

  • Serif
  • Sans serif
  • Script
  • Decorative

Serif fonts are the more old fashioned typefaces with little tails on their lettering. The little tails are called “serifs.” Sans serif font, literally translated, means “without serif,” so these are more modern fonts that don’t have the little tails on each letter.

Script fonts are cursive, where subsequent letters within a word are touching. Decorative fonts are certainly the most diverse typeface.

Some of these fonts aren’t letters at all, but decorative elements. Others are fonts seen in pop culture, like movie posters and book covers. And some are just meant to be bold and different; for headings, logos or signage.

Each of these different types of fonts have different classifications:

  • Serif classifications
    • Old Style Serifs
    • Transitional Serifs
    • Neoclassical & Didone
    • Slab Serifs
    • Clarendon Serifs
    • Glyphic Serifs
  • Sans serif classifications
    • Grotesque
    • Square
    • Humanistic
    • Geometric
  • Script classifications
    • Formal
    • Casual
    • Calligraphic
    • Blackletter & Lombardic
  • Decorative classifications
    • Grunge
    • Psychedelic
    • Graffiti

You can learn more about each specific type of font here if you’re interested. Check out this example from Visme’s font pairing guide:

In the first example, both fonts are using the Slab classification. This doesn’t offer much contrast between the two typefaces. Instead, use a Slab Serif font with a Geometric Sans Serif font, as shown on the right.

This offers a much more noticeable differentiation between the two font types (header versus body), and makes for a much more cohesive pairing.

Use contrasting sizes.

If your header is a 30-point font, you don’t want to pair it with a 24-point or 28-point body font size. These are too similar and will make it difficult to differentiate between your headings, subheadings and body copy.

Instead, you want to pair, say, a 36-point heading font with a 16-point or 18-point body size. This way, your readers will be able to easily tell which pieces of text are headings and which include body copy.

infographic best practice - font pairing size contrast infographic example template visme

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

This infographic template above is a great example of contrasting font sizes. The header font is much larger than the body font directly below it, offering a clear distinction between the two.

Use contrasting weights.

One idea to easily find your font pairing is not to choose two different fonts, but to instead choose two different weights from the same font.

Many fonts offer font weight options, and using a bold weight for your heading and a regular or light weight for your copy can be a great way to create a seamless font pairing while still offering contrasting elements.

Use a different font for each level of text.

One font for all headers, one font for all subheadings and one font for all body copy. If you try mixing and matching body fonts or subheading fonts, your design will look cluttered and messy.

Instead, keep it clean and cohesive by only switching up fonts when you switch its level in your infographic design.

Check out the infographic below as an example. It has three font types: one for the header, one for each of the subheadings underneath each icon, and a third for the body copy that further explains the subheading.

infographic best practice - font pairing text levels infographic example template visme

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

There isn’t a different font for each paragraph. The design looks clean and put together because each level of text has its own set font and design.

 

5 Infographic Best Practice: Select a Basic Color Scheme

Now that you’ve found the perfect font combination for your infographic, it’s time to select a color scheme. And you thought the hard part was over.

There are so many options when it comes to a good color scheme for your infographic. The important thing to remember is that you want to stick to 2-3 colors, maximum, just like when it comes to your fonts.

When it comes to colors, there are a couple of exceptions. If you’re using colors that are on a spectrum, like a rainbow or a range of shades of a single color, it becomes more acceptable to create a multicolored infographic.

The infographic example below utilizes three different shades of yellow to encompass a beautiful monochromatic color scheme. This is a multicolored (well, multi-shade) color scheme that does extremely well in its design.

infographic best practice - monochromatic color scheme yellow infographic example template visme

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

Other than that, you really want to stick to a basic color scheme of just two or three different colors.

How do you select the right colors for your infographic?

Don’t go into your color selection process blindly. Here are a few tips to help kickstart some ideas for you.

Use your company branding.

If nothing else, simply stick to your company’s colors.

This is a great way to match your company’s overall branding, increase brand awareness in your infographics and spend little to no time on the color scheme portion of your infographic.

If your branding has only one main color, you can find a complementary color or consider using darker/lighter shades.

Match the colors to your content.

What is your infographic about? Can you pull colors from the visuals or the topic you’re already planning on using?

This infographic template has the right idea. Its content is all about coffee, so its main colors are two different shades of brown (the color of coffee).

infographic best practice - color scheme brown coffee infographic example template visme

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

In a similar vein, the infographic below shares information on going green. Since this is an eco friendly or “green” practice, the infographic has brought different shades of green into its color scheme.

Draw inspiration from nature.

Colors that you find in nature (like a sunset, the forest, the beach) will always look natural and aesthetically pleasing to the eye, so pulling shades from these is a great way to choose a visually appealing color scheme.

The shades of blue and tan in the infographic below are pulled from a beach setting, and instill a feeling of peace for the reader.

infographic best practice - color scheme beach blue infographic example template visme

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!

  • Add your own text, icons, logo and more
  • Add interactive buttons and animations
  • Use drag-and-drop content blocks
  • Customize colors and fonts to fit your brand

Edit and Download Now

Use these tools to help you.

If all else fails, try one of these tools to help you select the perfect color scheme for your infographic.

  • Visme: When using Visme to create your infographics, you can easily choose from a ready-made color theme, and your entire infographic design will automatically adjust to your selected theme.
  • Coolors: Whether you need an entirely new color scheme altogether, or just need to find one that fits your main color, this automatic color scheme generator is fun and easy to use.
  • Color Hunt: This color palette library has tons of different options for you to choose from.
  • Design Seeds: Using photography to create beautiful color palettes, this tool should give you some great natural inspiration.
  • Paletton: If you’re looking for a monochromatic look, Paletton is the perfect tool to find darker and lighter shades of your main color.
infographic best practice - color palette theme scheme visme tool

Visme's color palettes and themes

Once you've selected the perfect color scheme for your infographic, it's time to move onto our last infographic best practice.

 

6 Infographic Best Practice: Include the Right Footer Information

When finishing up your infographic, you want to make sure you include the correct information in your footer.

This is where you’ll store all of the sources used to find the data included in your infographic, your company name, logo, URL and even a call-to-action.

Sharing your sources is extremely important, especially when it comes to data and statistics.

Check out the footer of the infographic below. It shares the exact source of the information used alongside the company name and social icons.

infographic best practice - sources footer infographic example template visme

Customize this infographic template and make it your own!Edit and Download

If you’re including data that isn't widely known, whether it’s in an infographic, a blog article or an email, you should always include a source.

This way your audience knows you pulled that information from a reputable source, and aren’t just making numbers up.

You can also pop your company’s logo into the footer for brand strength and recognition. This is a great idea if you’ve used branding elements within the infographic, as your logo will mesh well with the rest of the design.

Nearly every single one of Visme’s infographic templates let you update sources and company information in the footer of your infographic.

Giving credit where credit is due is essential, but taking credit for something you’ve created and plan to share online is just as important.

Make sure people can find you easily when they come across your infographic. Link to a corresponding landing page on your website, and include a call-to-action telling your audience what to do next.

This might be making a purchase, navigating to your website, learning more about a service or donating to a non-profit.

Including a call-to-action is a great way to incite action in someone who is just starting to become interested in your business or industry.

 

Create Your Own Design Using These Infographic Best Practices

These six infographic best practices will help elevate your infographic design game to the next level. Sign up and start creating jaw-dropping infographics today with Visme’s infographic templates and design center.

How many of these best practices are you incorporating in your infographics? Let us know your feedback and questions in the comments!

 



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About the Author

Chloe West is the content marketing manager at Visme. Her experience in digital marketing includes everything from social media, blogging, email marketing to graphic design, strategy creation and implementation, and more. During her spare time, she enjoys exploring her home city of Charleston with her son.

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